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Hatology & Hat Art


Hat Huts serier Hatology och Hat Art serverar jazz och klassiskt som verkligen är avantgarde.

Här finner du såväl John Cage, Pierre Boulez och Arnold Schönberg som Albert Ayler, Lee Konitz och Cecil Taylor.

Halva priset (50%) hela juli!
Visar 167 artiklar
Image Sonatas & Interludes
James Tenney, piano

How rare, and valuable, it is to be able to experience one composer's masterwork through the sensibility of another significant, stylistically distinct composer - via a performance that reveals unexpected aspects of both. that is to say, an approach to performance not as an act of self-conscious, flamboyant or dramatic interpretation, according to the concerns of technique, expression, and projection that are at the heart of an instrumentalist's presentation of a musical score to an audience, but something completely different; rather, an examination of the music's premise and complex details from a contrasting, individual, compositional curiosity.
(Art Lange)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Works for Piano
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Notations & Piano Sonatas (Nos. 1-3)
...It is hardly surprising that the significance of the chapters in music history does not depend on their size. But almost never has there been such a concentration of events as in the case of the development, manifestation and overturning of serial music. And what is even more remarkable is that the individual stages of a historical process (post-twelve-tone serialism in our case) can be illustrated with the works of one composer, that is, with the piano pieces of Pierre Boulez. Just one decade passed between the fragile as well as fugitive Douze notations and the prodigious torso of the Third Piano Sonata - between the early work of an unknown composer in his twenties, who was already firm in his resolve not to keep up the tradition he was part of, and the work of the thirty-year-old avant-garde star, who only had to loosen the ties he himself had put on before...

(Raoul Mörchen)

Pi-Hsien Chen, piano.
Pierre Boulez

12 Notations



Pianosonat nr 1, 2 & 3


95 kr (189 kr)
Image Copenhagen Live 1964
Presentation text (Engl.) The program is indicative of a customary set by the band, which is to say unlike any other music of the time. Ayler con- tinues a practice of elemental one-word composition titles with pieces like the tender “Mothers,” itself a recasting of the old spiritual “Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child”. There Ayler pulls out his vibrato stops from the start, drenching the audience in a warm current of matriarchally-minded pathos. Cherry acts as a strong cantilevering pres- ence, anchoring Ayler’s energy and interpolating his own freedom. It’s as if the two have slipped the pinions of tempo-ral order and entered their own private plane.

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Thingin
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Garden 2nd Set
Piano [Bösendorfer] – Cecil Taylor

Recorded live on November 16, 1981 at Grosser Saal Volkshaus Basel/Switzerland.
Digital recording on Sanyo PCM.
24 Bit Remastered
Reissue as part of the 40th anniversary of Hat Hut Records

95 kr (189 kr)
Image Solo Percussion
65 kr (129 kr)
Image Works for 2 Pianists
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Phonolith
65 kr (129 kr)
Image By the Law of Music
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Solo Works for Percussion
60 kr (119 kr)
Image One Great Day...
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Four Generations Piano
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Piano Sonatas Nos. 1-6
80 kr (159 kr)
Image As the Sea
Samuel Blaser, trombone
Marc Ducret, guitar
Bänz Oester, double bass
Gerald Cleaver, drums

It's that kind of trust that turns lack of rehearsal from disadvantage to advantage, lending it an exhilarating edge that comes from being placed in a new situation without any kind of safety net. Record producer/ambient music progenitor Brian Eno wrote, in his Oblique Strategies, "Honor thy error as hidden intention"; clearly a modus operandi for Samuel Blaser and his group. That this group can navigate Samuel Blaser's challenging composite of form and freedom with such effortless aplomb speaks to its growing chemistry, each member's ability to listen, and a collective musical background that extends far beyond the jazz tradition.
(John Kelman)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Musica Derivata
95 kr (189 kr)
Image On Duke's Birthday
BÄST 2007 ENLIGT MAGNUS ERIKSSON PÅ ROOTSY.NU

"Den brittiske pianisten och orkesterledaren Mike Westbrooks
svåråtkomliga inspelning från 1984 finns nu på cd. Westbrook
anknyter till Ellingtons tidiga sviter i sin strävan att skapa ett expansivt melodilföde med sömlösa övergångar."
(Svenska Dagbladet)

In Max Nagl's varied jumble of creative activities, Big Four comes nearest to what we traditionally perceive as jazz. Formed at the suggestion of the producer Werner X. Uehlinger, who introduced him to the recordings of the original Big Four (Sidney Bechet, Muggsy Spanier, Carmen Mastren, Wellman Braud) from 1940, the band released its first album in 2002 (hatOLOGY 585).
«I wanted to work again with trumpet player Steven Bernstein anyway, and this was an opportunity to do so,» Max Nagl explains. «I knew that he was at home in many genres of traditional jazz. It was clear to me that he, too, should score pieces for this band. I myself was more interested in the instrumentation than in the music of Bechet, actually.»
When the adventurous guitarist Noël Akchoté and the agile and equally powerful bassist Bradley Jones teamed up, an exciting mélange of strong, idiosyncratic personalities was born.
(Tom Gsteiger)
MIKE WESTBROOK ORCHESTRA:
Mike Westbrook, piano
Tony Marsh, drums
Steve Cook, bass guitar
Brian Godding, electric guitar
Dominique Pifarely, violin
Georgie Born, cello



90 kr (179 kr)
Image Forms 1-4
115 kr (229 kr)
Image 12 (+6) In a Row
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Redemption
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Im Klang
60 kr (119 kr)
Image Garden 1st Set
This new reissue of Garden presents the music for the first time in the original concert sequence. The previous CD and LP releases re-sequenced the music in order to fit on LP side lengths. Garden was recorded live on 16th November, 1981, at Grosser Saal Volkshaus Basel, Switzerland. 'Nature neither ages nor stays the same, it recycles and thus re-identifies itself perpetually, and we continually experience it from a new perspective. Likewise with Art; therefore it s impossible not to hear the music of Cecil Taylor akin to a force of Nature with different ears 34 years on. Similarities may be recognized, a few details confirmed, but the response must embrace meaningful change, or the music, and the recipient, are not alive, cavorting in the same time/space sensibility. The garden that is re-invigorated and re-defined does not die. Taylor s choice of the garden to represent this 1981 performance has its roots in his longstanding belief that creativity is the ever-present condition of Nature (in our case, Life), and that his music in particular grew (and continues to grow) out of a personal engagement with the blues a music, metaphorically, of the soil, grounded in the legacy of African Americans and specifically an awareness of the innovative transformational powers of Duke Ellington. As he explained in the 1960s to A.B. Spellman (Black Music: Four Lives, Schocken Books), 'He could play a blues, but man, the way the thing was laid out it transcended the single idea of the blues. I m still trying to come to grips with that, you know.' Art Lange


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Sintering
Harrison is a melodist who has found his own patterns for melody, apparent in the anxious repetition of an unresolved motif in the opening “Preludial,” in the transformative, alchemical heat suggested by “Sintering,” or the contrast of the transparent resolution of “River Dolphin.” Throughout, Harrison creates his own structural language with a music that is both deceptively simple and, ultimately, wholly beautiful … Stuart Broomer, August 2014

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Polwechsel
60 kr (119 kr)
Image Haunted Heart
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Women Composers 1
80 kr (159 kr)
Image L'Heure Bleue
80 kr (159 kr)
Image High Definition
4 AV 5 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I NORRKÖPINGS TIDNINGAR

"...en sympatisk platta..."
(Norrköpings Tidningar)

With this release, Morris and crew cement their status as musicians from a generation who have fully absorbed a polyglot view of the jazz tradition. They have the commitment, experience, and the innate understanding to seamlessly pull from both inside and outside, from swing to freedom. But they also have the dedication and creativity to make it their own. It is how they pull together all these disparate threads into a unified vocabulary indelibly stamped with their own sensibilities and personalities that makes this such a riveting statement.
(Michael Rosenstein)



80 kr (159 kr)
Image Ne Plus Ultra
...It's hard to understand why Warne Marsh was so neglected during his lifetime. It's harder still to substantiate the charges with which his music was branded-cerebral, cold, unemotional, uninvolving. This album alone, one of his best, should have been enough to put such absurd slurs to rest. The music of Ne Plus Ultra is intimate, warm, passionate, risky. There is much beauty to be shared...

(Art Lange)

Warne Marsh Quartet:

Warn Marsh, tenorsaxofon

Gary Foster, altsaxofon

Dave Parlato, kontrabas

John Tirabasso, trummor



90 kr (179 kr)
Image Mobile for Shakespeare
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Works for Voice & Chamber Ensemble
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Concept of Freedom
...By constructing a musical reality through the compositional impetus of Braxton and Ellington, these musicians remind us that the “Concept of Freedom” is an ongoing challenge that requires commitment, sensitivity, creativity, and vigilance, and that Art is not an escape from life, but an experience essential to life’s meaning and value...

(Art Lange)

Anthony Braxton, saxofon m fl.


80 kr (159 kr)
Image A B D
80 kr (159 kr)
Image A Songbook
Ensemble für Neue Musik Zürich
Jeannine Herzel, mezzosoprano
Omar Ebrahim, baritone
Hans-Peter Frehner, flute
Manfred Spitaler, clarinet
Lorenz Raths, horn
Lorenz Haas, percussion
Viktor Muller, piano
Urs Bumbacher, violin
Nicola Romano, cello
Anna Trauffer, double bass
Sebastian Gottschick, conductor


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Rossini
LIRA / ÅRETS BÄSTA 2008 ENLIGT MAGNUS ERIKSSON

Whether you believe that opera is the loftiest manifestation of lyric art, or a bastard tradition typified by mannered singing, indifferent acting and an audience that would have Robespierre rubbing his hands in glee, there's no doubt that it has some great tunes. British composer and pianist/tuba player Mike Westbrook gathered a few of them together in the mid 1980s for this Rossini project. Westbrook-Rossini grew out of a commission Westbrook received from a Swiss street-theatre company in 1984. The brief called for a band which could provide musical interludes for a play about the Swiss national hero, William Tell-a perambulatory band that could make itself heard in the open air, which explains the unusual seven-piece instrumentation including a sopranino saxophone, two tubas and (in the original line-up) no piano. At the suggestion of his singer/wife Kate, Westbrook listened to the 19th century Italian composer, Gioacchino Rossini's opera "William Tell," which went on to provide the source material for the commission. As Westbrook's enthusiasm for Rossini's music grew, so did the scope of the project, and an expanded version of the original theatre commission, including pieces from Rossini's "The Barber of Seville," "The Thieving Magpie" and "Otello," was performed at Zurich Jazz Festival in 1987 (and subsequently released on a double LP). A studio version was released on CD in 1988, and Westbrook-Rossini is a re-issue of that session. It's a playful, mellifluous affair in which Westbrook celebrates some of Rossini's best known tunes (even non-opera buffs will recognize most of them), refracted through his own singular, multifaceted, musical prism. Grand opera aside, the suite draws from post-Duke Ellington orchestral jazz, jazz-rock, free improv, Maghrebi folk music, tango and (slightly drunken) Ruritanian marches. Even the Lone Ranger is acknowledged in the full-tilt reading of the "galloping theme" from "William Tell," hinted at briefly in "William Tell Overture IV" and then embraced with abandon on the disc's closing track, "William Tell Overture V." Instrumentally, the emphasis is on richly harmonised ensemble work driven by Peter Fairclough's powerful, Sonny Greer going on Ginger Baker drums, but there are several fine solos from Lindsay Cooper on sopranino saxophone, Peter Whyman on alto saxophone and Paul Nieman on trombone. Kate Westbrook sings on three tracks-"L'amoroso E Sincero Lindoro," "Isuara" and "Tutto Cangia"-on which Mike switches from tuba to piano. Her performances, which are by turns respectful of the Italian opera tradition and subversive of it, are wonderful and stirring, highlights of the album. Westbrook-Rossini might not make an opera fan of you...but then again, stranger things have happened.
(allaboutjazz.com)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image To Ornette - Hybrid Identity
60 kr (119 kr)
Image 3D Family
It’s been 28 years since David Murray, along with Andrew Cyrille and Johnny Mbizo Dyani, played at the festival in Willisau. After listening for the first time after a quarter of a century, it brings memories—a flashback to the ’70s. It shows us an effervescent world that easily sinks into a melancholic veil of nostalgia. Wasn’t it exciting back then, when those who are fifty now were still dreaming their wild dreams, and when then-fresh alternative life plans were material for public discourse, or when still unspoiled musical views of life found their respective stages, among others in Moers and Willisau? The Woodstock years were not over yet, and Murray’s concert in Willisau is a valuable document of those years. He belonged to the top group of young competitors, a strong voice among the improvisors. New Jazz was still in the process of freeing itself, and had little interest in the patterns of earlier periods. It seached for longlasting meanings, through its choices of musical material and the trend-setting titles for its pieces. Post-modernity was a term that was not yet on everyone’s lips.

(Ulrich Kurth)

David Murray Trio


90 kr (179 kr)
Image Alchamie
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Music for Violin and Piano
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Where the Sky Ended
65 kr (129 kr)
Image Blurry
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Big Four Live
95 kr (189 kr)
Image That Certain Feeling (George Gershwing Songbook)
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Filigree
65 kr (129 kr)
Image (Santa Cruz) 1993 1st Set
Re-issue of the first live set from CD hatART 2-6190, recorded live at Kuumbwa Jazz Center, Santa Cruz, California on 19th July 1993 'The 'reception dynamics' embodied by the Yoshi patrons who gave Anthony Braxton a new sweater, the Santa Cruz woodwind technician who overhauled Braxton s instruments pro bono, and, most tellingly, the cheers of the Kuumbwa Jazz Center audience, are integral to the Quartet s stellar performances on Quartet (Santa Cruz) 1993. During its tenure, Braxton frequently described the Quartet s work with the phrase 'navigation through form.' For Braxton, the West Coast tour was a definitive demonstration of this meta-reality. While Braxton s use of 'navigation through form' was generally taken by commentators to mean an openended odyssey, the phrase now suggests a journey with a clearcut destination; as such, the music made at Santa Cruz represented a long sought-after goal, completing the Quartet s passage through Braxton s rapidly expanding music system.' Bill Shoemaker, July 1996


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Multiplication Table, The
4 AV 5 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I NORRKÖPINGS TIDNINGAR

En inspelning från 1997 som funnits utgiven tidigare, men som nu kommer på nytt i schweiziska Hatologys smakfulla utförande. Matthew Shipps pianoimprovisationer är stream of consciousness-artade. De föds i stunden, men åskådliggör också rörelserna i hans musikaliska medvetande med idéer, känslor, återkommande figurer och snabbt övergivna infall. Samspelet med William Parker på bas och trummisen Susie Ibarra är tätt och sömlöst, samförståndet totalt.
(rootsy.nu)

Shipp's music displays his own thought processes, and in trio lays out a physical trail reflecting the way the three players think along with each other. Following those thoughts leads us deep into a new jazz style that has sprung, like Athena from the brow of Zeus, out of the body of jazz preceding it. The new relative in the family looks fine already, and seems likely in the future to astonish us with further mighty feats.
(Steve Holtje)



80 kr (159 kr)
Image Willisau Live
We see many familiar faces each time we perform in Willisau and it’s always wonderful to reconnect with our friends over the years. It’s that warm feeling combined with a heightened awareness of the special nature of this annual event that makes this place, these people and these performances so memorable. This concert was recorded for SRF 2 Kultur and the combination of good vibes (on the part of the audience) and technical acumen (on the part of the recording engineers) resulted in a document that I feel is worth sharing. Please note that any distortion you may hear in the sound of the Hammond organ was original to the instrument and not introduced in the recording process. These vintage instruments each have their own particular character and Gary Versace truly brought this B3 to life in all it’s glorious grit and soul. Gary’s nearly telepathic musical mind along with Gerry Hemingway’s absolutely unique approach to the drums infused the music this evening with a very special and rare chemistry. It was a great pleasure for me and I hope you enjoy listening.
- Ellery Eskelin, November 2015

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Degrees of Iconicity
65 kr (129 kr)
Image Town Hall 1972
Anthony Braxton, alto saxophone
Dave Holland, double bass
Philip Wilson, drums
John Stubblefield, tenor saxophone, flute, bass, clarinet, gong & percussion
Jeanne Lee, voice
Dave Holland, double bass
Barry Altschul, percussion & marimba

By 1972 we still only had a vague and partial knowledge of Braxton's more formal nature. So Town Hall was a "coming out" in one sense, albeit an atypical one. In some ways, this concert reminds us of Braxton's roots in the collective experiences of the AACM, and at the same time anticipates the multi-logics and expanded resources of later endeavors.
(Art Lange)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Orchestral Works
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Land Tides
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Patterns In A Chromatic Field
Morton Feldman was one of the most enigmatic composers of the 20th century. That is to say, he was extremely intelligent and enormously opinionated, pulled no punches when it came to passing judgement on historical figures or his peers, and loved to talk about his work, so that there is a remarkable collection of his writings and many scattered interviews to give us insight into his music. And yet the information he offered, frequently anecdotal, was often philosophic or metaphoric in nature, so that it ultimately revealed few specifics about his compositional methods and aesthetic choices. For example, as forthcoming as he was about his obsessive relationship with painting, primarily although not exclusively the work of the Abstract Expressionist painters of the late 1940s, ‘50s, and ‘60s who were his close friends, we find that for all his talk of the congruities between artistic and musical qualities of scale, surface, or space, among others, much of his music – especially the later, longer scores of which Patterns In A Chromatic Field is a prime example – remains mysteriously idiosyncratic and marvelously cryptic. Art Lange

115 kr (229 kr)
Image The Way
145 kr (289 kr)
Image Mantra
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Synergy
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Highway My Friend
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Image Frost
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Image System of 5
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Grisailles (1-100)
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Blinks
Steve Lacy, soprano saxophone
Steve Potts, alto & soprano saxophones
Irène Aebi, cello, violin & voice
Jean-Jacques Avenel, double bass
Oliver Johnson, percussion

On Blinks, the listener hears the Steve Lacy group winning one of these games (kicking ass and taking names, as a friend of mine puts it), caught live 1983 in the big hall at the Rote Fabrik, Zürich. The band plays with such simultaneous togetherness and fire; they've already well-past cleared the ground and taken off as a cohesive ensemble, passed "stiff" period by, able to prod, push, surprise even itself. Just to hear Lacy take over soloing from Potts on "Blinks," like some Hendrix sharpened tendril of feedback: aggressive, interceptive, but continuous. Model of collectivity, balancing trust and risk.
(John Corbett, Chicago, 1997)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Quartet (Santa Cruz) 1993, 2nd Set
Reeds – Anthony Braxton
Piano – Marilyn Crispell
Percussion, Marimba – Gerry Hemingway
Bass – Mark Dresser

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Oracle
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Sunrise in Different Dimensions
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Concerto a Tre
60 kr (119 kr)
Image Basel 1977
I leave the discovery of favorite episodes or events to you. But it’s important to remember that despite Braxton’s compositional craft—the motivating factors behind the music and the formal glue that holds it together—this is, as Braxton intended all along, music that emerges from the particular combination of musicians. George Lewis is one of Braxton’s favorite collaborators, for reasons that should be immediately audible. Muhal Richard Abrams is a rare and fascinating addition to this group. Bassist Mark Helias and drummer Charles “Bobo” Shaw have not often been documented in Braxton’s music, yet they were occasional contributors during this period, and their familiarity with and commitment to the music is obvious. Despite the temporary, even fleeting nature of this ensemble, for me, what emanates from these performances is a spirit which exemplifies the life-affirming status of Anthony Braxton’s music, reveals new information about the past, and gives us hope for the future. Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Alluring Prospect
Trumpet – Marco von Orelli
Trombone – Lucas Briggen

Piano – Michel Wintsch
Double Bass – Kaspar von Grünigen
Drums – Samuel Dühsler

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Sweet Freedom, Now What?
14 years have passed since the recording of Sweet Freedom ­ Now What? Today the world is a very different and infinitely more dangerous place. The Berlin Wall has fallen only to have new ones rise up in Israel and along the US southern border with Mexico (to name a few). Physical walls separating people (for what ever reasons deemed legitimate) pale before psychological walls caused by economics, politics and wars spanning generations. Civil and human rights fall prey to expediency, caught up in a meat grinder of opinion, while the revolution is being televised in full, bloody and horrific color daily...hourly. Ends justify means with manifesto, bravado and claims of responsibility. "TOMORROW IS THE QUESTION» and the question is...NOW WHAT?


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Roots of the Moment
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Solo Live At Snugs
Tenor Saxophone – Ellery Eskelin

Ellery Eskelin performing solo on tenor saxophone at 61 Local in Brooklyn, NY, four original compositions, personal and distinctive improvisation like listening to tales from a well seasoned and adept traveler.

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Shots
Soprano Saxophone – Steve Lacy
Transferred By [LP transfer to digital] – Peter Pfister
Violin & Voice – Irene Aebi (tracks: 8)

A straw poll of people in the know will likely reveal consensus as to 1970s being Steve Lacy’s most adventurous decade. The soprano saxophonist operated from a residency in France for much of that period, soaking up the country’s cultural capital from a position as American expatriate, but also opening himself up to conclaves with improvisers of all nationalities. New compositions were frequent along with intense study of his instrument and the mastering of extended techniques. Even within the specialized subsection of his vast discography dedicated to duets with drummers, Shots is a singular encounter.
Co-conspirator Masa Kwate sticks to selection of Japanese traditional percussion that isn’t further delineated on paper, but includes wood blocks, gongs and taiko. Eight of Lacy’s compositions serve as the fodder. The partnership of the principals is at times as comedically antagonistic as it is obliquely collaborative. Kwate doesn’t so much accompany as operate independently, setting up sparse and skeletal patterns which Lacy’s deceptively simple lines bounce and deflect across and against. The players regularly launch volleys across each others’ bows with one or the other occasionally dropping out entirely to leave his confederate in isolation. Lacy’s wife Irene Aebi adds voice and violin to the final piece “The Kiss”, which uses an oddball piece of found text gleaned on one of Lacy’s afternoon garden perambulations and a recurring puckering reed pop as a starting points for ascetic rumination.
Lacy’s playful provocateur streak is on full display during “The Ladder” where he sounds off successive, sharply-etched tones, which vary only in rising pitch from low in the horn’s register to a strangled teapot whistle. Kwate can be just as perverse, thwacking way at a hand drum or dropping a percussive bomb right on top of a gossamer-thin Lacy line. The compositions are ripe with Lacy’s signature repetitions, some of which deliberately test and even fray patience with their obdurate insistence, others that are utterly disarming in their melodic purity as with “Moms”. The abrasive angles and piercing honks of “Pops” and the underlying delicacy, innocence and nursery rhyme simplicity of “Tots” portray a telling familial dynamic and point to the importance of the titles in exhibiting poetry as well through the usage of shorthand slang to convey a depth of associative ideas. The chirruping birdsong, acrobatic trilling and vocalized grunts on “Fruits” along with the world-weary, nasalized wheezing that inflects Lacy’s articulation throughout “Coots” characterize others.
The original LP, pressed in severely finite number on the Musica imprint, commands collectors prices and the session tapes are long lost. As such the sourcing comes from producer Werner X. Uehlinger’s personal copy with “The Kiss” culled from another copy in the possession of Emanem label owner Martin Davidson. Remastered and digitally-transferred by Hat house engineer Peter Pfister, the music sounds fantastic with only occasional remnants of audio hiss.

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Image Line Up
80 kr (159 kr)
Image S/T
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Bass Works
American composer and music theorist James Tenney (1934–2006) occupies a central position in the history of American experimental music. Dedicated to expanding the dimensions of aural perception, he sought innovative ways to reconcile such conventional dualities as sound/noise, consonance/dissonance, and harmony/timbre—all of which are artificial constructs of language that tend to impede the fluidity and rich variability of the listening experience. Just as Tenney was fascinated by the perceptual intersection of musical dichotomies, so did he believe there was no meaningful distinction between his theoretical research and his compositional explorations. He wrote extensively on the perception of musical form from a phenomenological perspective, and he composed numerous works that highlight the elegant and complex relationship among natural acoustic phenomena. Eric Smigel

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Flamingos
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Image A Memory of Vienna
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Image Out Right Now
65 kr (129 kr)
Image Neither (Opera)
80 kr (159 kr)
Image In The Corner Of The Eye
Despite the passage of time what’s most striking about In The Corner Of The Eye is just how innovative Doran’s music sounds today, a quarter of a century later. In The Corner Of The Eye is a thrilling affirmation of Doran’s status as one of contemporary music’s most significant acoustic and electric guitarists - on either side of the Atlantic.
– Ian Patterson, August 2015

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Image Field
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Image Mess Hall
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Image Zaki
Lake’s trio functioned on a democratic basis. «I‘m not the boss. One of our concepts is that we try to have an interplay. It’s not me being accompanied by the others. Pheeroan may start something that I’ll pick up on. From that Michael may add something, and then it will just keep on evolving and changing. We will sound like one flowing thing. It’s me (and sometimes Michael) writing the tunes, but we are all on an equal level in terms of where the music is coming from. We’ve been working together for three and a half years and are very sympathetic to each other. I feel very, very comfortable. We tune into each other and are very open inside. We play a melody and then try to go into other areas. I don’t like to structure the middle part because that’s where improvisation comes in. A preconceived structure would restrict us.»
(Jürg Solothurnmann)



80 kr (159 kr)
Image O Moon My Pin-Up
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Given - Live In Münster
4 AV 5 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I NORRKÖPINGS TIDNINGAR

"...spännande musik skapas."
(Norrköpings Tidningar)

Given - Live in Münster, is the Steve Lantner Quartet's second effort. Its sax-piano-bass-drums line-up invites weight against the measure of classic albums like Misterioso, Black Fire, Giant Steps, and Saxophone Colossus on the one hand, and thousands of rote quartet recordings on the other. Lantner's contribution falls on the right end of the spectrum by doing exactly what a jazz album must in order to justify its carbon footprint in the 21st Century; it presents a vivid impression of a singular musician with a strong band moving the music forward. Or as Lantner puts it, "I am trying to play jazz music in a language that I think is a natural evolution past tonal/modal sensibilities." - (Bill Meyer)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Piano Works
Above all this is music which still sounds as new as it did when it was first created, music conceived boldly without a hint of compromise. Yet, although I have suggested there are similarities to be found in these composers approaches to innovation and technology, fundamentally they could not be more different. In Beethoven, even in those moments in the slow music which propose a sort of repose, there is an irresistible forward momentum, a propulsive drive towards the new, the unknown, perhaps even the impossible. By contrast, in Stockhausen s music, animation and stasis are always balanced; a multitude of possibilities is being played out, but it is a multitude which the composer already holds in his head. It was this difference between Beethoven and Stockhausen, so acutely assessed by Jonathan Harvey, which meant that Kurzwellen mit Beethoven could never have succeeded, but it is this difference which also makes this such an exciting CD. To listen to this music in the sequence recorded here, alternating Stockhausen and Beethoven, then Stockhausen again, is as with Pi-Hsien Chen s previous of Cage and Scarlatti : hat(now)ART 188 to have one s ideas about music turned on their head time after time, to be confronted with the shock of the new in all its revolutionary diversity. Christopher Fox


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Stones
The music of Roland Dahinden and Hildegard Kleeb has grown from a combination of individual virtuosity, a shared life, a special environment and the gradual mutation and transformation of things in time. Stones is the expression of all of those things as well as a very special musical conception that generates different patterns, cycling forwards and backwards, inwardly and outwardly.
– Stuart Broomer, February 2016

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Jubilee Varia
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Tales Out Of Time
Alto Saxophone - Peter Brötzmann
Double Bass – Kent Kessler
Drums – Michael Zerang
Tenor Saxophone – Joe McPhee

These four musicians come with a reputation for inhabiting the outer realm of musical notation, which is where – notation be damned – melody is still ever present as is harmony and rhythm, all formal aspects of music, but completely reinvented in time and space, developing a geometry designed by a French curve rather than a set square. Not that mathematics is what drives the music. On the contrary and as the title – Tales Out Of Time – suggests the musical elements pirouette turning line after line into double helical matrices. Composition and freedom collide in narratives and brush strokes as if this were a musical book lavishly illustrated by painted abstractions. Thus unfolding in dramatic fables, these extraordinary chamber works will find the listener rendered speechless by unrepentant lyricism against a backdrop of startling swatches of colour.

Rather than being daunted by the sheer prospect of the ascent and drop of music that leaps and bounds as if through gulch and canyon, these musicians embrace the almost impossible challenges with verve and gusto. The Quartet set the bar very high with their astoundingly fresh and supple readings of what appear to be sometimes spare and sometimes crowded soundscapes. Peter Brötzmann, Joe McPhee, Kent Kessler, Michael Zerang swoop through the musical topography as if it were designed for unrestrained leaping, charging and gamboling rather than for rigidly structured negotiation. The rasping timbre of Peter Brötzmann’s saxophones duke it out in legendary pugilistic duels with the characteristically lyrical horns of Joe McPhee, Muhammad Ali’s proverbial term ‘float like a butterfly and sting like a bee’ is easily recognisable in the partnership, while the gentle berating of the rhythm section of Kent Kessler, Michael Zerang is the glue that holds it all together.

The writing, if one can call it that as this music devolves more from thematic sketches than anything else, is sharp and incisive and sustained by rugged textures. Aural sound worlds emerge like gigantic waves that ebb and flow, sometimes building in relative silence through exquisite gradations of dynamic and timbre before they disintegrate in colossal counterpoint as composer and musicians fight to retain ambiguity of mood and demeanor, as in “Alto Lightning In A Violin Sky” and to a greater extent in “From Now Till Doomsday”. Breathtaking later-day portamentos rock the brass and woodwinds as Mr. Kessler and Mr. Zerang create enormous staccatos encased in warmly voluptuous sound. All the while, rhythmic instability is brilliantly managed by each of the four musicians. Just listen to the adrenalin-pumped “Cymbalism” for instance and you will hear what I mean.

Contrast all of the above with – yes – even delicate tracery in “Something There Is That Doesn’t Love”, “Blessed Assurance” and the two “Stone Poems”. The quartet brilliantly captures the febrile quality of these modern ballads with precision and even grace. Throughout they relish these moody as well as the raucous in poignant ways. Often lyricism changes to more agitated writing but the gear-change is so smooth that you simply don’t notice it, so naturally is it done. The recording is immediate and present and when a group of musicians combined scholarship and performance in eleven superb pieces, what more could you ask for?

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Material
90 kr (179 kr)
Image Rotator
When one hears Michael Adkins for the first time, there's a certain shock, not just at the presence of a new voice but that such a musician might arrive fully formed. There's something unexpected in the sheer weight of his sound and depths of meaning that impinge in his lines. It might be noted that Adkins presents himself here as a tenor saxophonist, without that usual leap to the soprano or something else, a movement almost expected of those setting out to play jazz's dominant horn. Now that suggests a player very deeply involved in the formation of his own voice, a preoccupation to which this session attests, even to a concern with an authentic sense of speech.
(Stuart Broomer)



80 kr (159 kr)
Image What You Can Throw
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Cluster Swerve
Noah is a very skilled and mature improviser. He knows who he is. His confidence allows him to stay open to new ideas and to keep searching. Given the chance to work all the time, I think he would take the saxophone to many more new places. He uses technique with control and inspiration to make his own music. He got a lot from Joe Maneri. But I can say—as someone who has worked with both of them—that Noah has his own thing and he has years ahead of him to grow it.

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Travelogue
Field Recordings – Gil Distel, Herbert Distel
Guitar – Felix Hochuli

An electroacoustic composition from Herbert Distel, a "Travelogue" of field recordings organized into two long works that present hallucinatory sound with an illusive rhythmic component, structured into a long journey with a departure, journey and arrival.

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Complementary Contrasts: Donaueschingen 2003
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Roof Fool
Among instruments the piano is arguably the most fixed in terms of range and pitch. Purveyors have perfected all sorts of specialized techniques for altering these parameters through additions, subtractions and outright detuning. Swiss pianist Michel Wintsch is among this number, versed in playing the keys straight but also curious about how they might sound in a multitude of modified contexts. His solo project Metapiano, released on the Leo label in 2011, sought to expand the possibilities through an abundant assemblage of customized instruments and electronics.
Roof Fool, also solo, veers in a quietly radical and different direction. Across fourteen compositions, Wintsch seeks to involve the sounds and gestures commonly suppressed or excised in the conventional recording of piano music. He accomplishes this through an elaborate strategy of anatomical choreography and alternate miking at odds with usual placement patterns. In this regard, physical and temporal facets of performer and performance space join the instrument in becoming elements intrinsic to the emerging music.

Microphones activated near the pedals and above the keyboard pick up extraneous sounds of air displacement along with the breath sounds, murmuring and singing from the pianist that oddly brings to mind a more mannered and less invasive Keith Jarrett. The results are musical and recognizably in league with past work with improvisers like drummer Gerry Hemingway (WHO Trio) and bassist Christian Weber (WWW Trio), but also curiously removed in the addition of clicks, whirs and other former aural ephemera which are now integral to the performance in a Cageian sense.

The composition titles present another enigmatic feature of the puzzle. Making sense of their calculated word associations swiftly becomes an exercise in deciphering intentional esoterica. At surface glance “Soul’s Vague Algae” has more going for it phonetically than semantically, but musically the dampened and contrasting notes that comprise its construction hang memorably in the space between the ears. Similar abstruse relationships arrive with the pointed collisions and ablations of “However Named” and the bright and brittle Monkish progression that informs a portion of “Shopping Ladies”.

Critic Stuart Broomer’s accompanying essay offers sage advice in suggesting that a switch in scrutiny from strict lexical properties to individualized and abstract relational ones is order. Winstch does not appear to concerned either way, reveling in his personalized system of structured improvisation over three-quarters of an hour with purpose and poise and leaving the listener to ascertain associative meaning or not. Even without independent defined thematic and relational tethers in most cases, the pieces encourage careful auditory consideration.
(Derek Taylor, April 2015)

80 kr (159 kr)
Image At Gamut
As a trumpet player with many years of experience I am still interested in the music of younger colleagues. In the summer 2016, by pure coincidence I met and heard Silvan Schmid play and I was both impressed and touched by his very special playing. I was pleased to hear a trumpet player who plays “different”. Silvan does not sound “out of a school”. In his early years he already has his musical dialect… His beautiful tone, his very sensitive articulation and phrasing are an earcatcher. Brilliant technique, but no “flasher”. He integrates, without giving any of his personal assets away, into a given situation. Great fulfilment he obviously finds in an ideal way in his GAMUT projects. A fascinating group of astonishing young musicians that creates an ambient where improvisation and composition mutually dissolve into a resolution. – Hans Kennel, trumpet player, 2017

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Throwing Coins
Von Wyl’s music takes its cues and its distinctive palette from all these places and experiences, but this time perhaps it’s Rome and the Trevi that brings them all together. Is there abundance here? yes, in plenty. And is there salubrity? yes, to that, too; a sense of life, health and purpose, straight from the imagination of one of Europe’s most vividly original young composers. – Brion Morton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Counterpoise
65 kr (129 kr)
Image Ammentos
Piano – Claudio Sanna

A new voice worthy of your consideration is Sardinian pianist Claudio Sanna. His debut Ammentos, or "Memories,' finds a fully developed mature sound that is formed by classical music, but as with many jazz artists, open to other musics.

Classically trained artists like Sanna, Keith Jarrett and Herbie Hancock before him, can also be of their time. Where Jarrett has his transference with Charles Lloyd, Hancock learned jazz from Donald Byrd and then both ended up at the throne of Miles Davis, Sanna has straddled the classical and jazz fields.

The leap between genres requires a break with structure, and the ability to improvise. Sanna's transitions are effortless. The disc opens with "Ichnos," a fully-composed composition that relies of the constancy of left hand pulse and simple melody. From there, the pianist quotes Schubert with his "Sa Rocca Entosa," a quiet, reflective piece that adds a punch to the ending. But then, we are just getting started. "Sant' Andria" brings to mind the piano athleticism of Craig Taborn, with Sanna's repeated percussive cadence that cascades throughout. Where Sanna's music crosses into the jazz world is through his improvisation, which can be disguised as composition here. His fluent playing, like all jazzmen, masks his instant compositions. The lullaby "Zisca" begins simply enough, only to draw darker themes into the spiraling tightness of emotion.

His piano acuity, the ability to separate left hand from right is featured on "Sonazzos," a composition that roars with bass line and soars with his improvising right hand. He might have saved the best, or at least the most beautiful, for last —"Maripossa" a snail's-paced improvisation of ineffable sentiment. Bellissimo.

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Blow, Strike & Touch
Noah is a very skilled and mature improviser. He knows who he is. His confidence allows him to stay open to new ideas and to keep searching. Given the chance to work all the time, I think he would take the saxophone to many more new places. He uses technique with control and inspiration to make his own music. He got a lot from Joe Maneri. But I can say—as someone who has worked with both of them—that Noah has his own thing and he has years ahead of him to grow it.

80 kr (159 kr)
Image As It Grows
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Pond, The
"When Manuel Mengis' debut disk Into the Barn came out in late 2005, it took listeners by surprise. Here was a triple storm: strong instrumentalists, killer compositions, and the kind of tight ensemble playing that only comes from loads of time working things out together. Mengis and his Gruppe 6 delivered a combination of post-Bop acumen and rollicking audacity with a wily ability to blur the lines between compositional form and intrepid improvisation ... Two and a half years have gone by, and finally the young Swiss trumpet player and his musical partners are back with a resplendent follow-up. Mengis has never been one to rush things ... So dig in to this arresting follow-up. Let's hope that we don't have to wait another three years to hear from Gruppe 6 again. But rest assured that Mengis will take his time, planning out his next moves and executing them with the resolve and inventiveness that stamps this music as truly original. And that sort of measured deliberation is something that is all too rare these days."
(Michael Rosenstein)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Laboratorio: Solo Percussion
The correlation between space and sound has always been a driving force in my music. This recording is based on a project with architecture students, involving a fictitious percussion centre. The resulting ideas inspired me to compose music for spaces that do not (yet) exist - percussion sounds that reflect mainly the architecture of my mind. Enjoy! – Fritz Hauser

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Pythagoras Tree
60 kr (119 kr)
Image Suspended
Improvisation assumes a fresh experience, an unfamiliarity with what is to come, a disruption of expectations. How much more intense and disorienting the experience becomes in the music of Markus Eichenberger and Daniel Studer. Each one has an impressive résumé of musical adventures, but as a duo their music expresses special qualities and asks challenging questions. Suspended offers no customary structures, no consistent prototypes; the titles are not instructions, illustrations, or explanations. Manipulating an bstract dialect of sounds, many of them in the grey area between recognizable pitch and expressive noise, they initiate a system of relationships that allows – requires – the listener to participate in the spontaneous search for meaning. – Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Work
Piano – Uwe Oberg

Recorded live at Jazzclub im Domicil Saarbrücken performing compositions by Ornette Coleman, John Coltrane, Charles Mingus, Thelonious Monk and his own compositions.

There's a curious dichotomy in the musical perspective of Uwe Oberg that informs and intensifies everthing he touches...over references and veiled, possibly subconscious, allusions to a wide range of sources that imply several layers of stylistic influence and irony. And yet the music he creates has its own distinct character, and ultimately rejects confining genres. – Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Talking with Charlie: An Imaginary Talk with Charl
"I'm actively writing for these four instrumentalists – it's not only the instrument, it's also the person", Dahinden adds. It's a collaboration between the quartet and the composer, and as with Duke Ellington and his musicians, the results are personal, and of universal appeal. – Andy Hamilton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image A Notion In Perpetual Motion
Does the "perpetual motion" of the title refer to life on the road? Or the ongoing continuum of musical tradition, which in the hands of Rüegg can be honored and manipulated at the same time? Hard to say, since in the musical realm of Mathias Rüegg, meanings have multiple choices and anything is possible.
(Art Lange)


80 kr (159 kr)
Image The Heart's Ear
90 kr (179 kr)
Image Led By The Yellow Bricks
So let’s trust our ears. The music unfolds from small gestures. In the opening movement the piano takes the main part and successively combines with various partners. The ear gladly follows through different stages – and then, a small element, a little portamento on the clarinet (the kiss of the little old woman?), is enough to let us know that it is almost over. The music proceeds, delicate, determined; it draws a line that it follows, in the second movement it even moves along a kind of walking bass line. Its dramatic climax continues in the third movement, which is about “The Monster And The Big Yellow Poppies”. Deep, powerful chords on the piano – and high notes fluttering above: there’s something threatening about it. The movement ends with an almost menacing fortissimo. Are we scared? Or was that just another intimidating artifice of the Wizard of Oz? – Thomas Meyer

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Taktlos Zürich 2017
Parsed into four discrete pieces, the Taktlos performance is a fluid exercise in revolving roles from the jump. Ducret trades in jagged punctuations, mercurial arpeggios and swollen drone bursts on Stoppage, the first and longest. Blaser reacts as balm, his lubricious lines drawing a direct invisible lineage back suave and soothing bop purveyers. A reversal and it’s Blaser with low brass growls as Brunn colors the corners and edges keeping a rhythmic presence which bolsters and ornaments without drawing attention away from the colloquy of his colleagues. A drum solo filled with fluid, frothing beats works as both palate cleanser and reset into an ambling blues. Later, a froggy brass ostinato serves a similar purpose signaling first clean picking from Ducret and then feral, sharp-fanged blasts of distortion. – Derek Taylor

80 kr (159 kr)
Image As Serious As Your Life
The Hat Hut label was originally conceived in the mid seventies with the exact purpose of releasing music by the Miami reedsman Joe McPhee. Recent years have seen many of McPhee's Hat albums fall out of print, so it is encouraging that this 1996 offering has been re-issued. Now well into his seventies, McPhee continues to tour and record and his stature as an artist has never been higher, acknowledgement of an underrated but important voice. As Serious As Your Life, named after the Val Wilmer book as a tribute to the author and the music she championed, is a remarkable solo excursion utilising a variety of instruments, an album described in the Penguin Jazz Guide as 'a body of work which is as evocative and expressive as anything he has ever made.'


80 kr (159 kr)
Image Sonic Fiction
This trio's music is easier characterized than described, since the wealth of colors, moods, textures, and melodies is fluid enough to shift not only from piece to piece, but moment to moment. There is, for me, a European aesthetic at work here, a blend of modern and historic sources with the added bittersweet spice of folk elements from the soil. It's a delicate, demanding juggling act, drawing on past experiences while remaining alert and honest to the immediacy of this particular moment. Their intuitive tactics are frequently mesmerizing, as they simultaneously shadow each other's moves, suggest spontaneous new directions, and sustain individual perspectives; Reijseger etching deft melodic contours out of the merest effects, Hemingway exhorting and embellishing, Graewe – with a crisp clarity of articulation, an ear for piano sonorities, and a resolute insistence on building block foundations – instilling structural support and lyrical alterations. (Art Lange)

Georg Graewe, piano
Ernst Reijseger, cello
Gerry Hemingway, percussion



80 kr (159 kr)
Image Dulcet Crush
80 kr (159 kr)
Image In Hellen
From the beginnings of free improvisation in the 1960s, proponents subjected their instruments to unprecedented interrogation, in pursuit of the instrumental impulse. This is shown in the work of Swiss-German trio Kimmig–Studer–Zimmerlin: Harald Kimmig (violin), Daniel Studer (bass) and Alfred Zimmerlin (cello). On this recording, the instrumental impulse is exuberantly expressed, in what Studer prefers to call “improvisation without any prefixed compositional tool". The trio pull, grab and smack their strings, scratching and striking the body of the instrument, using it as a resonator. These are not mere "extended techniques". – Andy Hamilton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Distant Runner (The)
VALD TILL EN AV ÅRETS SKIVOR 2006 AV MAGNUS ERIKSSON PÅ ROOTSY.NU





5 AV 6 MÖJLIGA I BETYG I SVENSKA DAGBLADET



...Anthony Braxton, Steve Lacy och David Liebman har alla gjort mästerliga skivor utan komp. Deras saxofoner har legat nakna i fritt böljande, kontrastrika improvisationer. The distance runner rymmer Liebmans första solokonsert. Han öppnar med en melodiöst spänstig hyllning till Lacy på sopransaxen. Sedan skiftar han mellan sopran, tenor och flöjt i en nyansrik utforskning av olika existentiella lägen. I sviten The tree uppnår Liebman en visuell åskådlighet både i serena passager och när han bökar långt ner i registret. I Sidney Bechets Petite fleur visar Liebman sin förmåga att ge en välkänd melodi nya vinklingar. Det är oavbrutet vitalt, och i sina inre spänningar skapar Liebmans musik ett djupt meningsfullt flöde...

(Svenska Dagbladet)

David Liebman, sopran- & tenorsaxofon.


90 kr (179 kr)
Image Songs
VALD TILL EN AV ÅRETS SKIVOR 2006 AV MAGNUS ERIKSSON PÅ ROOTSY.NU





...Doubtless, Steve Lacy is one of contemporary music’s most prolific practitioners – and certainly one of the most recorded. But even within a catalogue as bulging and varied as his, this sequence of Songs is a singular experience...

...Throughout these remarkable Songs the music is inseparable from the words. Extramusical echoes may occur – for example, the melismatic winding of themes in “Gay Paree Bop” and “Somebody Special” may suggest Gysin’s Moroccan excursions. Or they may not. It doesn’t matter. What matters is their emotional resonance and unity of feeling, as urgent and accessible as those of Schubert transported to an age of anxiety...

(Art Lange)

Steve Lacy, sopransaxofon m fl


90 kr (179 kr)
Image Le souffle du temps, X (rétro-) perspectives
Make time to listen to this music, as the musician made time to prepare for it. Don’t wedge it into a pile of other CDs clamouring to be heard. Don’t immediately applaud it and move on to the next thing. Play it again. You’ll be playing it for years – Brian Morton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Triadic Memories
Morton Feldman's preoccupation with what he cal led 'acoustical reality' was the primary subject of ali his work but the intimate acoustic reality of the piano, the instrument at which he worked, became a particular focus during the last decade of his life. Piano (1977) and Triadic Memories ( 1981) sound like Feldman of course - both share that extraordinary sense of ti me suspended, of in­ strumental colour refracted through pitch and back again- but each also offers a radically different conception of the piano. Christopher Fox

115 kr (229 kr)
Image How It All Started
90 kr (179 kr)
Image For John Cage
Morton Feldman stated, ”The degrees of stasis, found in a Rothko or Guston, were perhaps the most significant elements I brought to my music from painting. For me, stasis, scale, and patter n have put the whole question of symmetry and asymmetry in abeyance.” … Typically, as is the case in For John Cage, Feldman presents a pattern (or sequence) of notes and/or chords, and may repeat them an unpredictable and asymmetrical number of times, until they are succeeded by the next pattern, but the pattern is never developed, reorganized, or mani pulated in any conventional fashion. Thus successive patterns are linked (or woven) together in an on going fabric of music, and an individual pattern may appear to be static, unchanging, unmoving. This is an illusion, however, since movement may be alternately measured by speed, emphasis (or attack), and (instrumental) color. Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Pagine Gialle
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Dortmund 1976
”It was at the first Dortmund Jazz Festival in Germany on October 31, 1976 that this group hit a magic peak.“ … The Braxton/Lewis/Holland/Alt schul line-up lasted for barely six months. They played their first concert together in Boston in May 1976 and their last in Berlin on November 4. … For me, the special attraction of the Dortmund concert is its air of celebration. There’s a palpable sense of fun to this music, attributable in part (I suspect) to the presence of George Lewis, who had just replaced trumpeter Kenny Wheeler in the quartet. The em pathy between the two Chicagoans fairly fizzes from the speakers: Lewis romps through these tunes with a snorting, rumbustious glee that elicits a brilliantly bravura and playful re sponse from Braxton. Graham Lock

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Block Beuys
95 kr (189 kr)
Image At the New Jazz Meeting Baden-Baden 2002
This synthesis of jazz, composition and electronic music was made possible above all by Steve Lacy’s extraordinary openness, which – as he himself said – has often brought him together with musicians whose roots are not in jazz. Steve Lacy was a searcher to the very end. We are going to miss Steve Lacy’s overwhelming passion for sonic exploration.
Steve Lacy, soprano saxophone

Peter Herbert, double bass

Wolfgang Reisinger, drums

Philip Jeck, turntables

Christof Kurzmann & Bernhard Lang, electronics


90 kr (179 kr)
Image Invisible Touch. At Taktlos Zürich
Shipp’s stated aim is that rarefied realm where ver- bal and written descriptors fail, subsumed by the primacy of organized sound, spontaneous and of the moment. Whether he reaches that space is always arguable both on the part of artist and audience, but this compact and intensely contem- plative set suggests an exemplar of success in that regard. In Shipp’s typically succinct and germane summation: “I did feel very good about the flow that I felt I got.”

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Shift
There is much to admire in Katharina Rosenberger’s music. She brings, always, a fresh or newly refreshed palette of instrumental sound. She creates structures that attract admiration for their improbable tensile strength – how does a piece like modules here – hold together? But this is not what makes the music special. Rosenberger does not invite us to sit and admire, and then, like the old composer (who is a real person, even though he remains anonymous) leave the room unmoved. Instead, she invites us in. She involves the listener. Brian Morton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Morning Joy...Paris Live
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Historic First Recordings of the Klavierstucke I–V
Stockhausen calls his piano pieces his "drawings", the pieces in which he sketches out ideas without the added color complexity of instrumental timbres. More significantly, in these early pieces you can hear a composer grappling with the challenge of electronic sound, looking for "envelope curves" that will allow the old medium to compete with the new. As played by Tudor in this historic recording, the piano gives its answer to the synthesizer. – Kyle Gann

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Topophony
Improvisation and composition as forcefield. The conundrum remains: how can one combine these two approaches to musical forming without one or the other being compromised or diluted? Christopher Fox has decided to have the best of both worlds. The soloists and the orchestral musicians are assigned roles that enable them to play to their strengths. The conductor mediates. The forcefield is maintained. Just as the improvisers are told not to study the orchestra music, to avoid coming to a fixed idea of that soundworld, so too are the orchestra and conductor confronted with the sonic, dynamic and gestural unpredictabilty of the soloists. Improvisation and interpretation meet head to head. – Nina Polaschegg

80 kr (159 kr)
Image …don't buy him a parrot…
Given the breadth of their experiences, Erb, Baker, and Rosaly make a fine assembly of magpies. When they first played together at the 2013 Umbrella Festival, they sought out a balanced collective voice. This session took place a few months later, and despite being only the trio’s second encounter — or maybe because of it — the players sound fully present in the moment, assertive in exchange, and attentive to the flux of density and flow. They are corvids in congress, their formations ever changing as they shift positions on the fly. And they do it, for the span of this session anyway, without reliance on electricity, let alone electronics. Stallman might reserve the right to pull out his laptop at dinner, dimming the luster of candlelight with the glow of his screen, but this trio stands ready to regale you if the lightsgo out. – Bill Meyer, 2017

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Trio
Feldman's canvas contains sparse, isolated tones and commentary in an environment of heightened concern. (Concern negates the idea that Feldman's music embodies an existential void.) Concern creates tension, energized by the composer's sense of responsibility, and desire. The music sounds familiar at times, where a motif occurs and is not forgotten, but returns in another place in another guise. Or multiple motifs (each instrument's persona! statement) are reassembled into something resembling something else, or only itself. Even Feldman's repetition is never exact, as there are slight shifts in weight, shade, density, intensity. And when, eventually, the music ends, it just ends, for no need, or reason, with no explanation, no answers. Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image New Jazz Meeting Baden-Baden 2002
145 kr (289 kr)
Image Atlantis
As we relate to music in an on-going condition of becoming, and not (like painting) a state of being, we're able to experience these works much as Morton Feldman did, as they happen, with an equal sense of wonder and delight. – Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Works For Piano
Philip Thomas, piano

Christopher Fox (born 1955 in York) is an English composer. From 1984 to 1994 he was a member of the composition staff at the Darmstadt New Music Summer School. Since 2006 he is Professor in Music at Brunel University.

95 kr (189 kr)
Image Tensegridad
The SLD Trio (Shocron,Lamonega, Diaz) is an exciting and adventurous group of young musicians from Buenos Aires. The Argentinian capital is not a city that is exactly known for an extensive free-jazz and improvised music scene; however, there is a dedicated core of artists and musicians in the city… This is a lovely and exciting album from a trio that is just as willing to give as to receive, and ready to synthesize the familiar with the unknown. On Tensegridad, these three strong, empathetic musicians are flexing their creative muscles, working hard together to share their excitement in making music, and giving back the community that they have received as much from. – Paul Acquaro, 2017

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Seeking
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Choralvorspiele; Andersen-Liederkreis
My music contains many musics, but impure, misremembered, smudged and melted, torn apart yet not completely erased. – Michael Finnissy Michael’s music is gnarly, gristly even — one senses keenly that it is the product of an intellectual yet instinctive wrestling with the very philosophy of music. – Juliet Fraser

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Transatlantic Swing
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Flaneur
There is a tendency to see jazz performance divided between uptempo numbers and ballads, but Adkins is perhaps concerned with something different, a thoughtful, alert, observant gait – Henry David Thoreau preferred to talk about ‘sauntering’ – that offers the player a new relationship with his surroundings. Adkins’ immediate surroundings are familiar enough, the group he unveiled on a previous hatOLOGY 660 recording Rotator; nly the bassist is a newcomer. Saxophone, piano, bass fiddle and drums – nothing new there, one might think. Except that Adkins does propose a new relationship between the constituent elements... These themes invite the listener to join the company, take a stroll, ‘let him be drawn by the attractions of the terrain’ and the encounters he might find there. We walk. We listen. We’ll hear. – Brian Morton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Chicago Overtone
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Strandjutters
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Lacy Pool
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Quartier Du Faisan
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Clarinet Trio
Ustvolskaya's music is dark, somber, even rem ote wh en a solitary voice holds sway. Her rejection of easily recognizable form suggests that, metaphorically, time is not a factor; as temporal references are acutely literai, the means to escape an oppressive time and place are found in spiritual, not social, values. Similarly, the chilling sparseness of textures becomes an emotionallandscape, scarred, sometimes painfully severe, where inner strength is necessary for survival. But there is, too, especially in the Duet For Violin And Piano, a sanctity of mood (shared with the la ter Shostakovich, when he was obsessed with dea th, and where, in his final works su ch as the Viola Sonata and Sonata For Violin And Piano, the influence of Ustvolskaya may be felt). ln moments like this, rare is the music where the human will is so immediate, so enduring. Art lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Ephemeral Rivers
Like all portraits this CD can be read in different ways: it represents a moment in time, not just the artist’s time but our collective time; it is intimate, but in its intimacy it shows us something of the society in which this music was made. The moment in time covers the years between 2011 and 2015, the period in which Cat Hope made the five works gathered here. Each of them inhabits what the composer herself describes as a ‘nexus of electronic and acoustic instruments, animated notations, drone and noise’ and although all of them might be described as chamber music, none of them is a chamber work in the classical sense of music for an exclusively acoustic instrumental ensemble. Instead, in each case the sonic resources of acoustic instruments are located within a musical frame that includes other elements: sometimes, as in Cruel and Usual, the live electronics extend the sounds of the instruments; sometimes the sounds created by the musicians are augmented by, or juxtaposed with other sound sources, such as the AM radio static in Miss Fortune X. – Christopher Fox

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Freedom of Speech
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Starcross Bridge
This album is rooted in the personal. Westbrook’s enduring creative partnership with his wife, the singer, lyricist and painter Kate Westbrook is represented by two songs they wrote together. Starcross is a rail station nearby the Westbrook home in Devon, near Plymouth where his creative life began all those years ago. His title track is dedicated to the tenor saxophonist Lou Gare, whose death in 2017 was a particular wrench. Starcross Bridge is an intricately woven network of musical and personal references. – Philip Clark

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Are You Going to Stop... In Bern?
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Alive In The House of Saints Part 1
Listening, eight years after it was created, to this primary chapter in the recorded legacy of Myra Melford's first trio evokes a rush of feelings. There are warm memories of in-person encounters with Melford, Lindsey Horner and Reggie Nicholson; and satisfaction regarding how the ideas Melford articulated here as both pianist and composer have metamorphosed into the triumphs of her subsequent music. What is absent is the uncertainty one often feels when contemplating the recent past, that feeling of needing more time to take the full measure of a musical state-ment. Melford has made it easy for us, through the clarity of both these now-historic performances and her subsequent efforts, to hear the present works as both glorious ends in themselves and the zoundations of her ongoing creations. Bob Blumenthal, 2001

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Archives of the North
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Alive in the House of Saints Part 2
Myra Melford is a polystylist, who draws on and creates multiple playing styles. In Alive In The House Of Saints these include stomping classic jazz piano with a funky attack, gospel plangency, country and blues lyricism, and free jazz episodes. Though from quite early in her career, Alive In The House Of Saints, Parts 1 and 2 is one of her finest recordings – high on the musical power spectrum, and one of the most exciting albums of piano jazz. The members of the trio respond organically to one another – their creative empathy is clear throughout. Melford is alive to everything she hears, responding in the moment to her musical partners. – Andy Hamilton

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Symbol Systems
Symbol Systems occupies a special place in Matthew Shipp’s discography. Originally issued in 1995 on the No More Records label, it was at the time his sixth release as a leader or co-leader, but significantly his first solo album, and as such provided us with the purest view to date of his multifaceted, indivisible improvisational/compositional concepts. – Art Lange

80 kr (159 kr)
Image Something To Live For
The world of Ran Blake beckons once again in these performances and, once again, we cannot resist being drawn into that world. We dodge through its shadows and its bright, glaring expanses, alert to the caverns and crevices from which the pianist’s images emerge – now gentle, now brutal, always unretouched. The cinematic content of Blake’s music, its use of montage and dramatic dissolves, has long been acknowledged. When he works in the short forms he favors here,there is also the clarity and unsparing honesty of a short story collection by an author like the late Raymond Carver. Extramusical allusions are unavoidable when music evokes all five senses, as Blake’s music inevitably does. Bob Blumenthal

80 kr (159 kr)
Image We Concentrate
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Works for Piano
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Enactments (Works for Piano)
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Faktura
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Fellowship
Recorded in 1998... the three pieces fall comfortably into a long-form, open presentation of thematic improvisation that feels even older – with its roots, say, in the freeing of forms that occurred during the ‘60s – while making allusions to and referencing details to be found throughout the history of jazz. This is neither an act of stylistic appropriation nor conscious postmodern juxtapositioning, but an organic collective response reflecting the individual life experiences of these particular musicians, as artists from different generations, different geographical locations, different musical environments (making even the group name, Fellowship, with its echoes of ‘60s cooperative optimism, all the more apt).

(Art Lange)
Theo Jörgensmann, klarinett m fl.


90 kr (179 kr)
Image Pika-Don
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Krom
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Into the Barn
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Some Trees
80 kr (159 kr)
Image 3 Suites and a Violin
80 kr (159 kr)
Image Radio Fractal, Beat Music Live at Donaueschingen 2
145 kr (289 kr)
Image Time Within Time
...Lika delar konstmusik och jazz blir en lyckad helhet...

(HiFi & Musik)



...broderande vackert solospel, mjukt och innerligt i samtliga tolv titlar...

(Ljusnan)



Jazzpianisten Marc Copland spelar här egna låtar, Leonard Bernsteins "Some other Time" och låtar av Wayne Shorter, John Lewis, Miles Davis m fl.

Marc Copland, piano.




90 kr (179 kr)
Image All Things Arise
95 kr (189 kr)
Image Railnotes
145 kr (289 kr)
Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
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